Healthy Hearts Eat Foods High in Fats?

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Exploring New and Old Health News Today – Healthy Heart High Fat!

Introduction

Oily fish such as mackerel and salmon have high long-chain omega 3 fatty acids, which have been reported as keeping the heart healthy. Having low triglycerides and increased High Density Lipoprotein (the so called “good cholesterol”) is of importance in your lipid profile. Cholesterol has been long controlled by statins however is there another way of controlling cholesterol?

The Science

A recent study conducted by Hagen et al. (2016) in the British Journal of Nutrition, where the aim of the study is was “to examine whether high intake of lean or fatty fish (cod and farmed salmon, respectively) by healthy, normal-weight adults would affect risk factors of type 2 diabetes and CVD when compared with lean meat (chicken).” In this study the authors compared consuming 750g/ week of lean meat (chicken) with fatty fish (cod and salmon) for 4 weeks.

The Results 

The high intake of fatty fish compare to the lean meat decreased blood triglycerides and increased HDL cholesterol (good cholesterol). These findings suggest that 750g per week of fatty fish may be beneficial to blood triglycerides and blood cholesterol, which are cardiovascular disease markers.

Conclusion 

Having a Healthy Heart use to be reliant on just taking statins to improve lipid levels and decrease cardiovascular disease and type II diabetes. It seems now some evidence shows that eating foods such as fatty fish rather than lean meats can help keep your heart healthy by decreasing bad lipids and increasing others. Why not start today and eat 750grams of Cod or Salmon each week!

You can find out more about Salmon here and Cod here. If you want to increase fish in your diet and are in need of other dietary advice contact us today.

References:

HAGEN, I. V., HELLAND, A., BRATLIE, M., BROKSTAD, K. A., ROSENLUND, G., SVEIER, H., MELLGREN, G. & GUDBRANDSEN, O. A. 2016. High intake of fatty fish, but not of lean fish, affects serum concentrations of TAG and HDL-cholesterol in healthy, normal-weight adults: a randomised trial. 116, 648-657.

 

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